Milk Processing
   

Homogenization
Milk must then be homogenized. Without homogenization, the milk fat would separate from the milk and rise to the top. Milk fat is what gives milk its rich and creamy taste. Homogenization makes sure that the fat is spread out evenly in the milk so that every sip of milk has the same delicious flavour and creamy texture. Milk is transferred to a piece of equipment called a homogenizer. In this machine the milk fat is forced, under high pressure, through tiny holes that break the fat cells up in to tiny particles, 1/8 their original size. Protein, contained in the milk, quickly forms around each particle and this prevents the fat from rejoining. The milk fat cells then stay suspended evenly throughout the milk.
Homogenization
Pasteurization
Pasteurization is the process that purifies milk and helps it stay fresher, longer. Milk is pasteurized by heating it to 72°C for 16 seconds then quickly cooling it to 4°C. Pasteurization is named after Louis Pasteur, the famous scientist who discovered that the process destroyed bacteria that naturally develops in raw milk. By destroying the bacteria, milk becomes safe to drink and holds it’s delicious flavour for much longer.
Pasteurization
Adding Vitamins
Before homogenization, vitamin D is added to all milk. Vitamin D combined with the calcium that naturally exists in milk, help give us strong bones and teeth. Interestingly, vitamin D and milk’s natural calcium work together to magnify the effects of each other. They provide more nutritional value than taking the same amount of Vitamin D and calcium separately. Dairies also add Vitamin A to skim, 1% and 2% milk. Vitamin A is good for our eyesight.
Adding Vitamins
Packaging Milk
Milk is now ready to be packaged. Milk is pumped through automatic filling machines direct into bags, cartons and jugs. The machines are carefully sanitized and packages are filled and sealed without human hands. This keeps outside bacteria out of the milk which helps keep the milk stay fresh.

During the entire time that milk is at the dairy, it is kept at 1° - 2°C. This prevents the development of extra bacteria and keeps the milk its freshest.
Packaging
Storing
Milk is delivered to grocery stores, convenience stores and restaurants in refrigerated trucks that keep milk cooled to 1° - 4°C. The stores take their milk and immediately place it in their refrigerated storage area. Because fresh milk is so important to our diets, dairies will often deliver fresh milk to the stores two or even three times per week. The dairy manager at the store takes the milk and places it on the refrigerated dairy shelves where your mom or dad can pick it up and add it to their shopping carts.
Storing
Reference: http://www.natrel.ca/english/
 
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